Tag Archives: History

We all have people.  You know, like the people next door, the people we meet, the people we work with, but I think when most of us use the term ‘people’ they are imagining family.     My birth family was pretty small– just my parents, my sister and I, one set of  grandparents in […]

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  • Aussa Lorens - How fascinating! I love the person who killed someone with her teeth– and the premature full sized babies.

    Sad for the unvisited psych ward gal though… we have had a lot of people like that as well.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - And this facility has a graveyard with a bunch of unmarked graves (sound familiar) however, this Aunt of mine was buried in the family plot off site- thank God. So sad.ReplyCancel

  • Cary Vaughn - I think mine on my father’s side were just a bunch of Southern slave drivers (my middle name – Sherman – was passed down from my father who got it from his father and so on). And My grandmother informs me that I am of South African decent and that James Michener wrote about our family in one of his novels or something (she told me when I was very young so do not remember the name). My great grandfather also founded the very first Church of Christ in Mississppi (again, this from what I learn from my grandmother). I guess I need to brush up on my family history.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - All of this sounds so fascinating Cary! You SHOULD do your research! My grandmother always said we were related to Jesse James,, but I’ve been able to debunk that. His mother was the sister of a step-mother. Oh, how family rumors start…..ReplyCancel

  • Carol Cassara - This is a timely post for me, since I’m just back from doing some initial research in Sicily. I came back with a clue to something I’m following up on that could be juicy, but not as juicy as yours!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Genealogy is sooooo fascinating. I’ve yet to visit so many of the places my ‘people’ have actually lived. Wouldn’t THAT be a great trip? Why yes it would- you just proved it!!ReplyCancel

  • Kathleen O'Donnell - I’m adopted, from Taiwan, so I don’t know much about my blood relatives. I have quite a few dysfunctional relatives so I’m not too excited to seek out more! But, I can see how fascinating it could be to know some of these things. Too bad you don’t have any people in the Bonaventure cemetery! You’d have an excuse to hang out there…the coolest place in all the world.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Two questions: 1) from Taiwan???? and 2) What’s this Bonaventure Cemetery???? I need to go there.ReplyCancel

      • Kathleen O'Donnell - Yes, I’m half Asian. I was adopted at birth in Taiwan by American, military parents who were stationed in Taiwan.

        Cheryl…the Bonaventure is THE place to hang (if you’re into that sort of thing, which I am) and it’s in your hood! It was made famous by the book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.ReplyCancel

  • Elaine Ambrose - Fascinating! You could write a separate blog about every relative. Start with the one who ran off with the priest…ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - I really could. What stories I could tell….ReplyCancel

  • Kim Tackett - Oh my goodness, you have a lifetime of stories there…to learn and to write. Love that you did the research and love the stories (and I agree, 18 babies…yikes).ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Holy Shit!!! 18!!! She lost her virginity and then died. Between the two events she had babies. What a life.ReplyCancel

  • Shy'ro Channing - Amazing what a history & your sense of humour kills me lol. I have to admit I have been curious but haven’t really found out that much thus far.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Making fun of myself is cheaper then therapy.ReplyCancel

  • Diane Tolley - Absolutely fascinating! There’s nothing more exciting and unbelievable than true life!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - That’s for sure. And this is only a ‘selection’ from my files. Oh boy….ReplyCancel

  • William Kendall - One of my forefathers was a landscape architect for the Dutch royal family. One of my sisters-in-law counts General James Longstreet among the members of her extended family, so somewhere along the line one of his kin ended up a Canadian.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Oh! I forgot! My ggggrandfather was Joseph Gouguen. One of the fathers of Acadia. He negotiated with the American Founders over Acadian support for the ‘Rebels’ in America. Have you ever heard about him?ReplyCancel

  • Lisa Carpenter - This is fascinating, Cheryl! I love hearing about such finds. I know a lot on my dad’s side but very little (nearly nothing) on my mom’s. She refuses to share… as does her sister… which makes me wonder all the more. ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - As it should. I’m REALLY good at this. If you want me to dig- give me a call.ReplyCancel

  • Cathy Chester - Terribly fascinating, Cheryl and of course your funny spin helps too. But you are so blessed to know your heritage. You should be on that show on PBS about learning your roots. I’d LOVE to be on that show.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Me too! I wish someone would contact me and do all the work, send me to all the right places with pro’s helping, and then wrap it all up in a neat little bow.ReplyCancel

  • Femme-de-Finesse - I’ve walked a similar path. It’s such a roller coaster of emotions as I become proud of those I “meet” then disappointed with the next person. Fun way to explore history, though!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Yes it is! I can’t imagine (now) not knowing no matter what. And I haven’t unearthed everything. There are still people (situations) living people won’t talk about- which makes me want to know more! Wishing you safe travels on your own exploration!ReplyCancel

  • Ruth Curran - I think that having all those children might have also contributed to all that drinking…and liver failure….and marrying family members :)!!! I love your perspective and how you weave a tale – you crack me up and I love it! ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Thanks Ruth! Maybe? I know it would have me! HAHahahaaaaReplyCancel

  • Mari Collier - All my ancestors came from Germany. The maternal line had carpenters, bakers, and my Great-grandfather was a sailor. The last time he came home from the sea, he hung himself because my Great-grandmother put my Grandmother out of the house (you can guess the reason), and my Grandfather (her first cousin) paid her way to America. She wouldn’t have been let into the country with a two-year-old child and no husband, but people were clever then. She wore widows weeds and a golden band with a black mark on it (that denoted the death of a husband). The other side has an interesting story too.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - My husband’s side has a similar story. His grandfather is the son of a ‘French Soldier’ and his mother immigrated unmarried with the child, from Sweden, where she was placed on the outskirts of town. Wow.ReplyCancel

  • Angela Weight - You are so funny. Your family sounds a lot like mine without the French cursing.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - There was a lot of cursing- in several languages. Hahaaaaa.ReplyCancel

  • Wendy Walker Cushing - That is so fascinating! My mother has paid a geneologist to do this for her and we were all given a book. My husband’s grandmother spent her whole life doing this research and they go back past the Viking times. He is a direct descendant of King Frosty of Finland! There are some other interesting characters like that. haha ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - King Frosty? Any relation to Kris Kringle? hahaaaaaReplyCancel

  • Rosalind Warren - Well of COURSE you’re descended from royalty? Aren’t we all? 🙂ReplyCancel

  • Linda - A couple of years before she died a great aunt, told us of ancestors known as the Harp Brothers, who have been dubbed Kentucky’s first serial killers. They made their living by killing and taking what they wanted. There is a marker (Harp’s Head) in Kentucky at the site where one had had his head cut off and displayed on a stake. After their deaths surviving family members changed the name to Erp. We do know we have Erp ancestors but have not made an official connection. Their story is available on the internet.
    That same aunt told us that she had never seen her birth certificate so we got a copy for her. It had her name listed as one she had never known. She said her parents were very superstitious and thought they probably believed if they didn’t use her true name that death could not find her.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - WOW!!! I LOVE these stories. I’ve never heard of the Harp Brothers, or using a different name on a certificate to thwart death. Fascinating. I hope you do the research and share it with all of us. I would LOVE to know more!!!!ReplyCancel

  • Rasma Raisters - I was born and raised in New York City. I am an American-Latvian. My parents and all other relatives were born and raised in Latvia. My parents had to leave their homeland during WWII. My dad Eriks Raisters was a popular Latvian poet and writer. ReplyCancel

  The year is 1911. Picture a young boy: poor, hungry, ignored.   He travels with his sheepherder grandfather, tending the flock.   The young boy is required to take the animals up into the mountains of Oregon, for months on end, alone. Only a make-shift wagon with a canvas top pulled by a mule […]

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  • Cary - My partner really wants one of these.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Don’t we all! They are AWESOME on the inside. Ben and I are thinking about getting one and making the restoration a project- like I need another ‘project’.ReplyCancel

  • Doreen McGettigan - My inlaws had one and it was a beauty. I loved caravanning with them when my kids were small.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - I bet. They really are just beautiful and, if my sister-n-law is any indication, the people who caravan are wonderful! So fun!!!ReplyCancel

  • Lana - This brings back such memories! My grandparents had an Airstream for years and were part of the caravan club – they had many wonderful adventures! Waiting for the story about Ted…ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Ya know? I really SHOULD write a post about Ted. Quite a character! Thanks for the idea!!!!ReplyCancel

  • Lynda@fitnessmomwinecountry - Cheryl, anytime I see one of these, I think of Lucy and Ricky
    {The Long, Long Trailer} movie. I love the planter box outside the window. I have never been inside one, but looks very fun for family travelsReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Oh you should see the inside!!!! So diminutive with not an inch wasted. Absolutely charming. I would go crazy decorating one in 1950’s vintage style. My sister-n-law is so stylish- that window planter box is perfect, and she had an awning sewn for outside from a new fabric that looks vintage. Very clever. Let’s all get one and meet up! hahaaaReplyCancel

  • Carol Cassara - Airstream. Grey’s Anatomy. I’ll say no more.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - What???? You’re going above my pay grade- again!ReplyCancel

  • Susan - ofeverymoment - The photos make me want to visit!
    Also, after reading your bio about Wally, if my life story ever needs to be told – I want you to write it!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Ohhhhhh, I’d LOVE TO!!!! I’m thinking of writing my Obit- now. Hahaaaaa I will be amazing if I have anything to say about it!ReplyCancel

  • Suzanne Bluth Robertson - Yes, yes… I want one. It looks so FUN. I love the garden on the back.

    Suzanne
    chapter-two.netReplyCancel

  • William Kendall - I’ve seen these things in campgrounds, but never did get in one.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - AMAZING inside. So compact but efficient. Very Retro and shiny. I like it all!ReplyCancel

  • Vashti Q - Hi Cheryl! This entire post fascinated me from start to finish. Now, I really want one of these and the adventures too! 🙂ReplyCancel

  • Terrye Toombs - How awesome is THAT?! ReplyCancel

  • Alana - Yes! Yes! Yes! This has been my dream since I worked in an insurance agency in Arkansas that wrote insurance on Airstreams (and other types of travel trailers and mobile homes). There is something so special about Airstreams.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - They are….. beautiful. Really beautiful. It fast becoming one of my ‘dreams’ as well. Meet you at the Caravan?ReplyCancel

  • Cheryl Craggs - Your writing really drew me in, and to be about such a fabulous land craft, even more! Your brother in law sounds like someone who will try anything! I gather it was intentional? xReplyCancel

  • Enchanted Seashells, Confessions of a Tugboat Captain's Wife - Wish we had an Airstream; I’ve always loved them! FYI, I’m under orders from my tugboat man to make sure everyone knows it’s “Merchant Marine”, not “Merchant Marines”, and one is referred to a a “Merchant Mariner”. (Don’t shoot the messenger!!)ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Good to know. I’ll go in and make the change now….ReplyCancel

  • Sue - Airstreams are such a head turner. Loved the story!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - A kind of ‘house’ for you to write about on your wonderful blog?ReplyCancel

  • Gary Sidley - So I can now add ‘marketing executive’ to your burgeoning list of talents! My good lady has recently expressed an interest in caravaning; if she were to read this post I’m sure she’d flip into overdrive and nag me into submission. ReplyCancel

  • Big Top Family - Wow! What a great story, I loved this. And yeah, even though I already did my time in a trailer back in 1979 or so, you did kinda make me want an Airstream. 😉 ReplyCancel

  • Claudia Schmidt - I always thought it would be way cool to travel cross country in one of these babies! Maybe I still will, when the kids are out of college. Love the pictures, cool story, I had no idea about how he came up with them.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Thanks Claudia! I agree- very cool. We should start our own caravan group? Wouldn’t THAT be a R-I-O-T!!!ReplyCancel

And…. I’m driving. D-R-I-V-I-N-GGGGGGLa Dee Da Dee DaMusic playing. Wind in my hair.Almost perfect… except I’m talking to one of the kids on my bluetooth.“Yes. That sounds fine…. No, I’m not paying for it.”What the hell is that?“Mom? Mom! Did you hear me?”Turning around.“Yes. I heard. But say it again and speak up.”One more passssssss.“What are […]

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The skies were cloudy and it was cold. My feet slipped on cold floors.My mother was dressing my baby sister and reminded me to bundle up for school later in the morning.In the meantime, would I like to watch cartoons?Why yes I would. Can I put a blanket on the floor? Can I put it over the […]

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  • Cathy - Tragic day from the eyes of a little girl. So sad.ReplyCancel

  • A Pleasant House - yes. For all. I’ll never forget. I was so scared.ReplyCancel

  • Cyndi Calhoun - I’m affected by this and I wasn’t even anywhere being born, yet. The assassination of anyone is a tragedy. But this, it was so profound and so historical. And you were so little. I can tell that day had a profound effect on you, too. Very compelling post. HUGSReplyCancel

  • Kung Phoo - Wow that was a great recount.ReplyCancel

  • Helene Bludman - I love the way you wrote this post, Cheryl. It sounded very authentic to me.ReplyCancel

    • A Pleasant House - My life was that of any little child that day- just trying to understand what had happened and why all the grown ups were crying. Thanks Helene.ReplyCancel

  • Lynne Spreen - What happened after that?
    I remember being almost that little and for some reason mindlessly beginning to climb into my teacher’s car after school one day. Following her, I guess. She turned around at me and SNARLED, Where do you think you’re going?!? I was so frightened and shocked. Don’t even remember the end of my story. PS it was a Catholic school.ReplyCancel

    • A Pleasant House - Honestly Lynne, I don’t remember. My mom must have been home or the babysitter with my sister at least. I don’t remember another mention of this day- from my parents, or anyone else for decades. I don’t remember my parents crying or talking about it either, or seeing it on TV. It’s just sort of a big blank for me after getting on that bus. Maybe I was so scared I have blacked it out?ReplyCancel

  • Kay Lynn Akers - Your recount brought tears to my eyes as I felt the confusion of a young girl and really probably the whole country at that point. Great job!ReplyCancel

    • A Pleasant House - Thank you Kay. I think you’re right, though maybe a little girl felt it differently, but nonetheless, it was important. Thanks for stopping by. ALways wonderful to have a new reader!ReplyCancel

  • William Kendall - A very effective way of recounting the story.ReplyCancel

  • Kristi Campbell - Wow, what a visceral post. Beautiful and effective way to tell this story. Wow. I was going to ask what happened after that too but see another reader already did. What a great way to recount history. I really loved this.ReplyCancel

  • Natalie DeYoung - Wow, this was really well written. It felt like listening to your small self talk about it. I can’t imagine what that must have been like.ReplyCancel

  • Elin Stebbins Waldal - wow. so much packed into your memory. what a truly beautiful way to reach back in time and take care of the girl you once were. so beautiful.ReplyCancel

    • A Pleasant House - Thank you Elin. I really had no other choice but to tell this as I remember it. I’m so glad you enjoyed.ReplyCancel

First Question: What does a ‘Chain’ restaurant and an amphibious war craft have in common?Second question: How did lumber from Brazil and a war between China and Japan save American lives?Let’s ask Andrew Higgins for the answers…“Thank you for meeting me here Mr. Higgins. It’s a lovely restaurant.”“No worries. I used to have one of […]

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