Tag Archives: Travel

  It goes like this:      After the French and Indian War (1754-1763), the American Revolution (1775-1783), and the War of 1812 (1812-1815) the original 13 colonies found themselves broke.       Without the means to repay the farmers, and clerks, and boys, and widows, that had won these conflicts the state of Connecticut […]

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  • Carol Cassara - Screw the living history, i want your mom’s POT ROAST! Only kidding. I love stuff like that. But I do like pot roast. If it’s a good one.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - I hear ya. I will post her Pot Roast recipe soon. It will NOT disappoint.ReplyCancel

  • Elin Stebbins Waldal - Love the images at the end of your post, makes my hankering for fall to hurry up and arrive in California grow stronger! Your post inspired me to seek a living history farm here and I discovered there is one two hours from my house, it looks gorgeous too. Thanks for the great tip!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Good for you! They really are all around us-Living History opportunities. I just LOVE them. I recently heard of a new plantation that has opened to the public and will be scouting it out soon. Stay tuned!ReplyCancel

  • Cathy Chester - Love history and this was so interesting. Love to feel those yarns. I should really seek out these places in my own back yard. We are rich in history as well! It’s not all Soprano’s and Housewives of NJ!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - New Jersey has such a rich history I bet they are and if you do- I’d love to hear about them!ReplyCancel

  • Tammy - Loved this. Everything about it. History is so freaking interesting. And everything has it. We forget that. Every old building, every old table with rings on it has history. If only the walls could talk.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - I know!!!! I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been sitting in a place and started asking too many questions about it’s history. LOVE IT!ReplyCancel

  • Myke Todd - Fascinating display of Americana… Both interesting and informative… Love your pictures!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Thanks Myke! Glad you stopped by!!ReplyCancel

  • Carollynn - Ok, so when ever you put food in the title, I’ve grown to expect an amazing recipe to accompany the story you tell. I was sad when I reached the end of the story, and no recipe for pot roast 🙁ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Oh boy. You caught me! I WILL be posting that darn recipe soon!!!ReplyCancel

  • Anne Louise Bannon - Love open air/living history museums like this. What fun. But I don’t get how pot roast won the West, unless you mean women bringing families in and… Or is it just a joke and I’m not getting it. Sigh. Wouldn’t be the first time.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Even I don’t know what I meant- really, but yes, the idea that w/o women and their good cookin’ all would have been lost. Or something that that. Wouldn’t be the first time I didn’t make sense. Ha!ReplyCancel

  • Sheryl Kraft - Sounds like a perfect day – topped off by a yummy home-cooked meal, of course!ReplyCancel

  • Kathleen O'Donnell - Love to go to places like this. Our last road trip we went to Springfield, ILL so I could get my Abe Lincoln freak on. They preserved the whole street his house is on. Even got to see the triple seater outhouse. The family that…together…ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - We stopped by what was supposed to be his log cabin in Kentucky once. Problem was/is that THAT cabin is long gone and the park services put up a pretend cabin near what they THINK was where his father settled for a bit- once. *head shaking* At least you got to see the TRUE three-seater!ReplyCancel

  • Nancy Hill - Oh, I love the stories of western expansion (except the part where the people who already lived there were “resettled.”) Was this before they drained the Black Swamp, aka Ohio? I love personal, and often that means feminine, takes on history – and small house and village museums play a critical role in preserving and conveying that history. Oh, and by the way, you have my vote for “best blog post title!”ReplyCancel

  • Lisa at Grandma's Briefs - Your history lessons are dished out in such pleasingly humorous bits and bites. If history in high school had been as fun as yours, I believe I’d be far more educated in that way. Love this! (And pot roast!)ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - I’ve got a million of them. Have you heard the TRUE story about how the Oxford Dictionary came to be???? AMAZING!!!!!! I really should write about that….. thanks for the inspiration!ReplyCancel

  • K. Lee Banks - Thanks for sharing the great pictures and some of the history behind them. I especially like the spun wool!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - The wool was gorgeous and soooo soft. The colors so rich. They sold skeens in the gift shop. I bought a few- of course. HehehheeeeeReplyCancel

  • Mari Collier - People down on their luck cannot afford $1,200 payment and build such a stately manner. I love visiting a place like that. You are right about potroasts. Even used that in my one story.ReplyCancel

  • Abby - Cheryl the Historian- I love your new profession! I could sit by the fire place all day with you and listen to your stories:) Plus you make me hungry with this stuff!
    xx AbbyReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - You’re so sweet! I LOVE history. These are a few posts from a few years ago that no one read. I’m re-posting because I have a FULL calendar this month and with the autumn upon us I think people like to read a good yarn. Hahahaa Thanks Abby. XXOOOReplyCancel

  As I sat having a succulent lunch of creamy salt-tanged corn-battered fried oysters (accompanied by my niece Virginia, her handsome husband Steve and – let’s not forget our most important guest- a bean-laden Bloody Mary), feeling especially fortunate at having the daily opportunity to enjoy New Orleans cuisine and share it with others, I […]

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  • Cary Vaughn - Whoa. This lady knows how to hit ’em where it hurts (living successfully!).ReplyCancel

  • Angie Mobley - My goodness! What a story! Can’t say I shed a tear over the father-in-law’s fate…ReplyCancel

  • Estelle Sobel Erasmus - Wow. And you know how to tell a story!ReplyCancel

  • Roxanne Jones - Yowza–what a story! Living well is, indeed, the best revenge!ReplyCancel

  • Roz Warren, Writer - Wait. There were beans in your Bloody Mary??ReplyCancel

  • Cathy Chester - I always knew it was a colorful place but now ever more so. P.S. Guess we’ll have to come visit another time now that we know the real history!ReplyCancel

  • Carol Cassara - NOLA has the best stories, the best history — every place you go is just steeped in mystery or craziness or…. well, I love it for its quirks. That’s what makes NOLA NOLA, right?ReplyCancel

  • Ellen Dolgen - I hope the food was as juicy as that story! WOW………….that is quite the history lesson!ReplyCancel

  • Mary La Fornara Gutierrez - Wow, what a story! I have always want to visit, but I have to say the stuff that goes on there scares me a bit!ReplyCancel

  • Carolyne Kauser-Abbott - Thansk for sharing that story there is a good book on her life: Intimate Enemies: The Two Worlds of the Baroness de PontalbaReplyCancel

  • Helene Cohen Bludman - Wow, what a story! You’re right, you could never make something like that up. One of these days I must visit NOLA!ReplyCancel

  • Carolann Iadarola - I’ve never been there, but I’d surely love to go! I’ll have to tell the hubby that needs to be our next trip. That’s so story! Sounds like a great place to dine!ReplyCancel

  • Mari Collier - I’ll lift my glass to this post. What a story! If I were more scholarly, I would write a biography. Oh, if you could spare some of those fried oysters, it would be lovely! I’m sharing this one!ReplyCancel

  • Eve Gaal - Great story but I can’t even imagine anyone asking whether they should order dessert in Nawlin’s. I mean come on- did you get overheated? What did you finally order? Bread pudding with whiskey sauce? Brandied Pecan pie? Cream filled eclairs? The thought of the decadence makes me want to pull out a pistola too, unless you tell us!ReplyCancel

  • Janie Emaus - Well, that was quite a story!ReplyCancel

  • Lois Alter Mark - Your stories are the best! It must be something in the water in NOLA!ReplyCancel

  • Tammy - Just when you think you’ve got it rough, something like this comes along and you realize your life is like a crème puff! How in the world does someone survive a point blank shot to the chest?! Especially back in those days. Geesh! The woman is my hero! If there isn’t a book with NOLA tales, YOU should write one!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - He must have shot her from an angle and just took the breast off. I don’t know? She must have brought her hand up to shield the shot and that’s how she lost the fingers. Whatever way it went down I’m glad she won!!! WOW!ReplyCancel

  • Abby - That’s quite a story! And a women with balls, we like that! Not to mention the yummy food:)ReplyCancel

  • Diane Tolley - I LOVE histories! I have that exact picture as a puzzle. Wondered what it was. Now I know! 🙂ReplyCancel

  • Chloe Jeffreys - Proving once and for all that it’s hard to keep a good woman down.ReplyCancel

  • Roshni AaMom - Scrumptious story!! 😀ReplyCancel

The year was 1774.      Friar Antonio de Sedella was sent to the territory of Louisiana by Spain’s King Charles III to continue the work of converting heathens to Christians through a little process called an ‘Inquisition’.      Friar Sedella didn’t much like the King or forcing people to convert by having their […]

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  • Adela - That looks soon good. And you’re right about the portrait. If he’s had a child, the child is hiding under a bed somewhere.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - HA!!! You’re so right! A scary looking dude for sure!ReplyCancel

  • Mari Collier - I loved this one. I really need to look this one up as I am rather ignorant of the Catholic policies in that area and time. I’m more familiar with the policies of England’s Angilical Church during the time England dominated the colonies.ReplyCancel

  • Carol Cassara - Oh, you make me want to go back to NOLA right away. I have to put it on our calendar, and soon! And I’m hungry.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Can you imagine LIVING here? Everywhere I go- great food and a story. I’m transfixed!ReplyCancel

  • Tam Warner Minton - I’ll have to try this next time I’m in New Orleans!ReplyCancel

  • Ellen Dolgen - All news to me! Thanks for feeding my brain this delicious blog!ReplyCancel

  • Janie Emaus - Well, it’s almost midnight here and I’ve way too much already. But now I’m hungry again!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - I feel your pain- or is it weight gain? (That rhythms!!) I’m so talented….ReplyCancel

  • Carolann Iadarola - That dish looks fab! I never knew about him so thanks for the education. I’ll have to google him for sure.ReplyCancel

  • Karen D. Austin - I have never been to New Orleans. This post is giving me another reason to get there some time soon. Yummy and educational post.ReplyCancel

  • Lisa Carpenter - Oh, that looks delicious! I’ve never been to New Orleans but when I finally get there, I *must* visit Pere Antoine’s!ReplyCancel

  • Donna Davis - What a guy! Even though i havent heard of him before hes okay in my book. I LOVE to eat so leaving the coins behind for a feast…….BRAVO!ReplyCancel

  • Estelle Sobel Erasmus - I so love your history lessons!ReplyCancel

  • Rasma Raisters - Interesting write. I enjoy reading about things to do with history.ReplyCancel

  • Tammy - My family has history in NOLA. I remember many a visit during Mardi Gras (crazy!) My aunt is on a plane this morning to visit her sister who has lived there for 55 years. Never knew this little piece of juicy history. Kind of awesome to read your blog and become more enlightened. Good to know!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - I’ve got a suitcase full of them- history lessons about this place. I’ll have to re-post a few more.ReplyCancel

  • Diane Tolley - Fascinating. An I can see what you mean about his portrait. Another of those great-hearted people who’s beautfy only shines when you know them!ReplyCancel

  • Gary Sidley - Is he not, what some would call, ruggedly handsome?

    Bon appetite!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - I think only the ‘rugged’ part. *burp*ReplyCancel

  There’s no way to explain this ‘transition’ without first sorting out the word ‘compromise’ insofar as it sleeps intermingles with the phrase ‘long term’. In this case: Marriage.     You marry a guy.   He’s funny.   He’s cute.   He’s ambitious.   You get along.   You have a few kids.   […]

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  • Abby - No, seriously Cheryl? I hope at least he lets you take your Hermes shawl and a case of Chardonnay with you:) just in case you realized what you got yourself into?
    xxReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Wait. Until. You. See. What. I do. With. The. Interior….. OMG!ReplyCancel

  • Sharon Hodor Greenthal - This is my husband’s dream. We may have to do it someday. I have to say yours looks totally adorable.ReplyCancel

  • Carol Cassara - Would it be wrong to say it looks way cute? That I’d like one, but maybe a tad larger? But that I need a driver because my husband is a TERRIBLE driver and I am uncoordinated? Yeah. Thought so.ReplyCancel

  • Barbara Hammond - You are more generous than I! Camping is against my religion!ReplyCancel

  • Elizabeth A. Havey - We camped in out early married days. Not now! But I do love your camper.ReplyCancel

  • Sue Pekarek - I’m going to have to sit by the river and learn to cook fresh fish someday too, so this cutest camper on the planet looks wonderful to me.ReplyCancel

  • Angela @ Setting My Intention - So exciting! My husband and I are looking at Tiny Houses and campers too. We’re not close to moving into anything that contained, but dreaming…ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - This is TOY and NOT a LIFESTYLE!! Dear God, I’m not that crazy! Hahahaaa. The Tiny Houses are awesome but not as mobile so I found this little brand new retro baby and swooped her up! Stay tuned Angela…. the misadvetures are bound to come our way!ReplyCancel

  • Karen D. Austin - That looks like it’s going to be a lot of fun. All my best to the both of you. I’m just getting ready for my first kid to graduate from HS. (I’m an older parent–in my 50s but with 2 teens at home.) It’s interesting to see you get on the other side of this hard part. I’m in the freak out over college costs mode right now.ReplyCancel

  • Chloe - Nice trailer. Welcome to the club. Ain’t love grand?ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Hey sweetie girl! Just to be clear- we will not be LIVING in this- just tooling around makin’ hay! *wink*ReplyCancel

  • Cristy Stern Zdenek - Cheryl, it looks amazing. I love it!!ReplyCancel

  • Katy Kozee - That is the cutest thing ever. And you are living my dream – we’re still in the “How are we going to pay for these schools?” stage of life. I can’t wait to be past that and beside a river. I’m lucky though – it’s my husband who’s the non-camper so I’ll probably be comfortable wherever we end up.ReplyCancel

  • CAROL CASSARA - I know I commented on this. I know I did. But where? It’s adorables.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Well, this one stuck. Glad you gave it the ole college try! It IS adorbs!ReplyCancel

  • Helene Cohen Bludman - You will have the best adventures! I can’t wait to read every post about your travels.ReplyCancel

  • Tam Warner Minton - Randy and I considered it…then we took a 3 week road trip and imagined staying in RV parks and having to set stuff up. I remain dedicated to hotels.ReplyCancel

  • Mari Collier - At least you are not sleeping on the ground! You are so lucky. When we were young together it was the only way Lanny would go: Sleep on the ground in a bedroll. Later arthritis prevented that. He would not buy a travel trailer so we just went where there were motels and real beds. Ahhh! Funny you’re “When did this happen?” question.ReplyCancel

  • Carolann Iadarola - Sounds like a fun adventure for sure. I’ll look forward to reading all about them and turn a little green with envy too lol.ReplyCancel

  • Leanne Le Cras - it might not be the Ritz but it’s WAY better than a tent!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Retro 1961 Shasta Airflyte!! With all the modern conveniences of course.ReplyCancel

  • Lisha Fink - And you can rent it out for Mardi Gras!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Holy Crapolla! That’s genius!!!ReplyCancel

  • Rena McDaniel - I can’t wait to see how this is going to go! You need to start a book right now!ReplyCancel

  • Kathy @ SMART Living 365.com - Hi Cheryl! It might not be what you were expecting but who knows? It might turn out even better than you could have imagined. And what a cute way to compromise. I’m looking forward to reading about where you go from here. ~KathyReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - I will be taking notes and passing them along you can be sure of that!ReplyCancel

  • Nora Hall - What a great take on compromising! thanks for sharing.ReplyCancel

  • Kathy Gottberg - Hi Cheryl! It might not be what you were expecting, but who knows? It might turn out even better than you could have imagined. And what a cute way to compromise. I’m looking forward to reading about where you go from here. ~KathyReplyCancel

  • Gary Sidley - That camper van will be a lot of fun, I’m sure.
    Compromise is so important in a long-term relationship. My wife used to hate football (soccer) for the first 15 years of our relationship, whereas our two kids and I have always been fanatical. Then one day she decided to come along to a game, loved it, and is now as keen as me. But on reflection that might not be compromise, but just giving in!ReplyCancel

  • Suzanne Fluhr - One of my fantasies — not shared by my beloved.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Here’s the way I see it Suzanne- It wasn’t one of mine either but BUT if I want to see him I needed to bend a little. My way, of course, but BEND none the less.ReplyCancel

  • Messing With A Sure Bet: Shasta Camper Update » A Pleasant House - […] We recently procured (sounds pretty fancy don’t ya think?) a brand new 2015 Retro-1961#Shasta camper. I talked about it here. […]ReplyCancel

    Ten years ago, on August 29th a powerful storm saved New Orleans. I know that sounds twisted curious, but ‘save’ the City, it did.   Backstory: We were still living in Ohio. Reinventing ourselves Relocating to New Orleans had not yet come into our future plans.   The entire world knows what happened […]

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  • carollynn - Yup, yup, and yup. You’d never know I was a college grad by my language skills 😉 I agree with everything . single . thing . you. wrote.

    I have loved NOLA for many years, (pre and post Katrina). While the devastation of Katrina was beyond words, it forced the US of A to re-evaluate the treasure that is NOLA and bring in resources to ensure it would survive and ultimately THRIVE.

    What is lost is lost, (and undeniably A LOT was lost) but from the watery grave has emerged a new, energized, better NOLA.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Yes! It really is amazing to see how the city has/is re-building, however, the street up-keep is deplorable. We just got a notice in the mail that said all of the roads should be fixed by 2018- so there’s THAT! I hope I can wait- so does my car.ReplyCancel

  • Carol Cassara - We keep talking about getting back to NOLA. I was there right after 9/11/01 and not since. It’s on our list. In fact, it’s top of our list. Happy that so much has re-emerged. I love NOLA. I just need to get thin enough to eat some beignets. Just sayin’;.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - Good luck! I’ve gained at least 15 since eating my way through this town.ReplyCancel

  • Lisa at Grandma's Briefs - Such a positive take on what happened AFTER the horrors! I hope to one day see the reinvented NOLA. I never got to see the old one, but this sounds like it may be even better. Except the roads. 😀ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - There is SO MUCH to be positive about! And the people are so charming. You’d love it!ReplyCancel

  • Mari Collier - I had read some of that, but I did not know the rebuilding had been as thorough as you imply. I do hope they can keep the corruption down, but then there is human nature.ReplyCancel

  • Estelle - The last time I was in New Orleans was 10 years ago right before Katrina. I loved visiting and one time I even ended up on a Mardi Gras float!ReplyCancel

  • Nora - Such great news!ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - It really is Nora. I can’t imagine a World without NOLA. Thanks for dropping by.ReplyCancel

  • Sue - You alone has made me want to visit New Orleans with all your colorful posts about the city. I remember the horror and that my we often watched from the hospital where my Mom was in her last days.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - We;;, you know where you can get a room- for cheap! And cocktails!!!ReplyCancel

  • Diane - Amazing how such a tragedy can turn into such a blessing! That’s life…ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - It’s a Cinderella story. But we both know not every tragedy is. Fingers crossed we have another Hurricane free season.ReplyCancel

  • Thefamilyjewlz Pembo-Bohning - I have had so little time to read any articles in the blogs that I follow. *sad face* I do like to visit yours because of course NOLA is where my soul resides. I have enjoyed many stories here on your blog, and I thank you. So yesterday I saw the Katrina one & loved it! Here’s why…it was short (like me) ;o), factual, and made me think…O my gosh, 10 years already?! Where is the time going?! Anyway, what you said about the roads…my doctor is on Napoleon and I go every 4 months. Each time I think…not yet?! And Magazine from the river??…don’t get me going!! LOL! Great little article shug. Have a nice day!ReplyCancel

  • Quirky Chrissy - I was there before, and I was there after…and I didn’t notice too many changes, but I sure do remember loving it both times. Would love to return soon. Please send pralines.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - A lot of the improvements are in the infrastructure, but so many homes have been renovated, and Magazine St. has never been more vibrant. Pralines are on the way. *wink*ReplyCancel

  • Rena McDianiel - I was there both before and after as well. I actually learned more from you in this post than I learned watching all of those hours of TV before and after! A great explanation. The memorial is so touching.ReplyCancel

    • Cheryl - The memorial is in a far-off place, down the southeastern edge- a fishing area. A friend of ours has a fishing ‘camp’ (raised house) down there. We went down to go out on the boat for the day and as we turned on the road I saw this amazing ‘thing’ out in the water. I inquired and went closer. It is absolutely beautiful- just standing there in the middle of a place hardly anyone goes to. It’s only about 50 yards off the land. And it’s huge! Amazing!!ReplyCancel

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